Now that we've reviewed basic terminology, let's look at some of the differences between trading stocks vs. currencies. In currency trading you are always comparing one currency to another so forex is always quoted in pairs. Sometimes authors of currency research will refer to only one half of the currency pair. For example if an article is referring to the euro (EUR) trading at 1.3332 it's assumed the other currency is the U.S. dollar (USD).

Disclaimer: Any Advice or information on this website is General Advice Only – It does not take into account your personal circumstances, please do not trade or invest based solely on this information. By Viewing any material or using the information within this site you agree that this is general education material and you will not hold any person or entity responsible for loss or damages resulting from the content or general advice provided here by Learn To Trade The Market Pty Ltd, it’s employees, directors or fellow members. Futures, options, and spot currency trading have large potential rewards, but also large potential risk. You must be aware of the risks and be willing to accept them in order to invest in the futures and options markets. Don’t trade with money you can’t afford to lose. This website is neither a solicitation nor an offer to Buy/Sell futures, spot forex, cfd’s, options or other financial products. No representation is being made that any account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those discussed in any material on this website. The past performance of any trading system or methodology is not necessarily indicative of future results.
Unless stated otherwise, the web content provided by E*TRADE is for educational purposes only. The information and tools provided neither are, nor should be construed as, an offer, or a solicitation of an offer, or a recommendation, to buy or sell securities or other instruments by E*TRADE. Unless stated otherwise, no information presented constitutes a recommendation by E*TRADE to buy, sell, or hold any security, financial product, or instrument discussed therein, or to open a particular account or to engage in any specific investment strategy. This information neither is, nor should be construed, as an offer, or a solicitation of an offer, or a recommendation, to buy, sell, or hold any security, financial product or instrument or to open a particular account or engage in any specific investment strategy.

Leveraged trading in foreign currency or off-exchange products on margin carries significant risk and may not be suitable for all investors. We advise you to carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances. Forex trading involves risk. Losses can exceed deposits. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading.

Most DIY investors and traders may want to sign up for the IBKR Lite account, which includes free stock, ETF trades, and no base fee for options trades. IBKR Lite has fixed pricing for options. If you’re a high-volume trader, you may want to upgrade to IBKR Pro. The Pro tier gives you access to fixed or tiered pricing options and longer trading hours.


If you are concerned about trading foreign currencies without the leverage, we can tell you that some great traders in the market do not use leverage. The following example will illustrate how this can still work. For instance, you buy $2000 with the 1600 EUR. So, in the worst case, if the price of USD drops by 50%, you are not bad. In this case, you are still left with 800 EUR. On the other hand, if you use the leverage ratio 100:1, bear in mind that you will lose all of the money. Even if you earn something without using the leverage it cannot be anything significant. Only wise decisions can lead you to serious profit.

Futures are financial contracts that require a buyer to purchase an asset, or a seller to sell an asset, on a predetermined date and price. To better understand these contracts, "Fundamentals of Futures and Options Markets" provides a great introduction. John Hull, a professor of Derivatives and Risk Management, uses real-life examples to help you comprehend futures and options markets.

One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
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